Italian Minister of Science opens industrial exhibition at CERN

On 30 November 1993 His Excellency Professor Umberto Colombo, Italy's Minister for Universities and Research opened the sixth "Italy at CERN" exhibition. The Minister was accompanied by His Excellency the Ambassador Giulio di Lorenzo Badia, Permanent Representative of Italy to the International Organizations in Geneva. CERN1's Director-General, Prof. Carlo Rubbia welcomed the Minister and expressed his pleasure at the extremely wide range and high quality of the equipment on display at the exhibition saying "I have always considered these industrial exhibitions to be a living epitome of the market-place, where supply and demand meet freely... and thus improve the global possibliities of an ever closer cooperation between industry and research".

In his inaugural speech Prof. Colombo discussed CERN's new accelerator project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC):"The time for decision has come. We should not delay any longer than is necessary to assess, and then, barring unforeseen difficulties, approve the design and financial package of the new project, including both machine and experiments. Italy is in favour of prompt action leading to a final decision on the construction of LHC. This decision will, hopefully, emerge among all the CERN Member States in forthcoming months.." Prof. Colombo also stressed the importance of exchange between Research and Industry: "In fact, high energy physics cannot develop further without undergoing the major transition to an industrial phase. The new project envisages the production of thousands of superconducting magnets, construction of experimental apparatus which are six stories high and weigh tens of thousands of tons. Clearly, the physicist cannot do all this by himself. He must rely on industry".

Prof. Chris Llewellyn Smith, Director General Designate, highlighted the outstanding contribution of Italian scientists to the evolution of particle physics. He also praised the high quality of research carried out by the Italian physics laboratories and mentioned the exemplary organisation of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). Prof. Llewellyn Smith paid tribute to Carlo Rubbia whose drive and imagination has played such an important part in the establishment of CERN as the world's leading particle physics laboratory.

More than forty hi-tech companies present their products at this new industrial exhibition at CERN which takes place from 30 November 1993 to 3 December 1993. This exhibition offers companies from Italy the opportunity to display their products in fields that are of immediate importance to the scientists, engineers and technicians working at CERN, and also to scientists from non-Member States who take part in research projects at CERN. The range of products covers a wide area: superconducting magnets, small and precision machined mechanical components, heavy mechanical components, electronics sensors, electrical and mechanical instrumentation, cryogenics, high vacuum systems and various other scientific systems and instruments. The "Italy at CERN" week has been organised by The Italian Institute for Foreign Trade.

CERN is one of the most prestigious centres for fundamental research in the world where European countries have brought together their scientists to build unique machines, specially designed for research in elementary particle physics. CERN's complex technological needs act as a catalyst in stimulating industrial progress in Europe. Due to the high quality of their products and a dynamic business policy, many Italian companies played an important part in the construction of the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). More recently Italian companies have been involved in the upgrade of the accelerator - LEP II which will result in doubling the energy of the particle beams.

CERN is in the process of preparing a new project of unparalleled importance, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle collider which will bring protons into collision to create the same energy conditions that existed only 10-12 of a second after the birth of our Universe in the Big Bang. The preparations of LHC have already mobilised an important scientific momentum and Italy strongly supports the initiative. CERN will make an appeal to the most sophisticated technology in order to construct LHC, for instance in the fields of superconductivity, cryogenics and electronics, offering European industry a new opportunity to display their potential. Ansaldo made the first 1m prototype for a LHC magnet and also recently finished the first 10m superconducting magnet prototype, soon to be delivered to CERN for testing. Italy also provided one-half of the superconducting magnets for the HERA accelerator at DESY. The "Italy at CERN" exhibition will allow Italian industry to demonstrate their willingness to contribute to this extremely important project which will enable European scientists to continue to play a major role in the research on the structure of matter.

On 30 November 1993 His Excellency Professor Umberto Colombo, Italy's Minister for Universities and Research opened the sixth "Italy at CERN*" exhibition. The Minister was accompanied by His Excellency the Ambassador Giulio di Lorenzo Badia, Permanent Representative of Italy to the International Organizations in Geneva. CERN's Director-General, Prof. Carlo Rubbia welcomed the Minister and expressed his pleasure at the extremely wide range and high quality of the equipment on display at the exhibition saying "I have always considered these industrial exhibitions to be a living epitome of the market-place, where supply and demand meet freely... and thus improve the global possibliities of an ever closer cooperation between industry and research".

In his inaugural speech Prof. Colombo discussed CERN's new accelerator project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC):"The time for decision has come. We should not delay any longer than is necessary to assess, and then, barring unforeseen difficulties, approve the design and financial package of the new project, including both machine and experiments. Italy is in favour of prompt action leading to a final decision on the construction of LHC. This decision will, hopefully, emerge among all the CERN Member States in forthcoming months.." Prof. Colombo also stressed the importance of exchange between Research and Industry: "In fact, high energy physics cannot develop further without undergoing the major transition to an industrial phase. The new project envisages the production of thousands of superconducting magnets, construction of experimental apparatus which are six stories high and weigh tens of thousands of tons. Clearly, the physicist cannot do all this by himself. He must rely on industry".

Prof. Chris Llewellyn Smith, Director General Designate, highlighted the outstanding contribution of Italian scientists to the evolution of particle physics. He also praised the high quality of research carried out by the Italian physics laboratories and mentioned the exemplary organisation of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). Prof. Llewellyn Smith paid tribute to Carlo Rubbia whose drive and imagination has played such an important part in the establishment of CERN as the world's leading particle physics laboratory.

More than forty hi-tech companies present their products at this new industrial exhibition at CERN which takes place from 30 November 1993 to 3 December 1993. This exhibition offers companies from Italy the opportunity to display their products in fields that are of immediate importance to the scientists, engineers and technicians working at CERN, and also to scientists from non-Member States who take part in research projects at CERN. The range of products covers a wide area: superconducting magnets, small and precision machined mechanical components, heavy mechanical components, electronics sensors, electrical and mechanical instrumentation, cryogenics, high vacuum systems and various other scientific systems and instruments. The "Italy at CERN" week has been organised by The Italian Institute for Foreign Trade.

CERN is one of the most prestigious centres for fundamental research in the world where European countries have brought together their scientists to build unique machines, specially designed for research in elementary particle physics. CERN's complex technological needs act as a catalyst in stimulating industrial progress in Europe. Due to the high quality of their products and a dynamic business policy, many Italian companies played an important part in the construction of the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). More recently Italian companies have been involved in the upgrade of the accelerator - LEP II which will result in doubling the energy of the particle beams.

CERN is in the process of preparing a new project of unparalleled importance, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle collider which will bring protons into collision to create the same energy conditions that existed only 10-12 of a second after the birth of our Universe in the Big Bang. The preparations of LHC have already mobilised an important scientific momentum and Italy strongly supports the initiative. CERN will make an appeal to the most sophisticated technology in order to construct LHC, for instance in the fields of superconductivity, cryogenics and electronics, offering European industry a new opportunity to display their potential. Ansaldo made the first 1m prototype for a LHC magnet and also recently finished the first 10m superconducting magnet prototype, soon to be delivered to CERN for testing. Italy also provided one-half of the superconducting magnets for the HERA accelerator at DESY. The "Italy at CERN" exhibition will allow Italian industry to demonstrate their willingness to contribute to this extremely important project which will enable European scientists to continue to play a major role in the research on the structure of matter.

Footnote(s)

1. CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, has its headquarters in Geneva. At present, its Member States are Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Israel, the Russian Federation, Turkey, Yugoslavia (status suspended after UN embargo, June 1992), the European Commission and Unesco have observer status.

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