Latest press releases

University of Geneva honours LHC project leader at 450th anniversary ceremony

Geneva, 5 June 2009. The University of Geneva is today holding a ceremony at which honorary degrees will be bestowed on four figures renowned for their activities in bringing nations together, including international collaboration in scientific research at CERN1.

The ceremony is to celebrate the university’s 450th anniversary2. The honorary degrees, which recognize endeavours in human rights and in fostering dialogue between nations, are being awarded to Mary Robinson3, Desmond Tutu4, Pascal Lamy5 and Lyn Evans.

Austrian participation in CERN

Geneva, 11 May 2009. This afternoon, a meeting took place in the Ministry of Science and Research in Vienna between Austrian Science Minister Johannes Hahn, CERN1 Director-General Rolf Heuer, and CERN External Relations Coordinator Felicitas Pauss. In a constructive working meeting, Minister Hahn explained the reasons for wishing to end Austrian membership of CERN at the end of 2010.

Final LHC magnet goes underground

Geneva, 30 April 2009. The 53rd and final replacement magnet for CERN's1 Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was lowered into the accelerator's tunnel today, marking the end of repair work above ground following the incident in September last year that brought LHC operations to a halt. Underground, the magnets are being interconnected, and new systems installed to prevent similar incidents happening again.

CERN launches new youth site on Web’s 20th anniversary

Geneva, 13 March 2009. Web veteran Robert Cailliau today launched CERNland, a new website for young people, on the occasion of the Web’s 20th anniversary. CERNland has been developed to bring the excitement of CERN’s1 research to a young audience aged 7 to 12 through a range of films, games and multimedia applications. It is available at http://www.cern.ch/cernland.

“I’ve been involved with CERNland from the start,” said Cailliau, “and It’s great to see CERN using the Web to reach out to a young audience.”

CERN celebrates 20th anniversary of World Wide Web

Geneva, 13 March 2009. Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee returned to the birthplace of his invention today, 20 years after submitting his paper ‘Information Management: A Proposal’ to his boss Mike Sendall. By writing the words ‘Vague, but exciting’ on the document’s cover, and giving Berners-Lee the go-ahead to continue, Sendall was signing into existence the information revolution of our times: the World Wide Web. In September of the following year, Berners-Lee took delivery of a computer called a NeXT cube, and by December the Web was up and running, albeit between just a couple of computers at CERN.

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