Latest press releases

LHC sets world record beam intensity

Geneva, 22 April 2011. Around midnight this night CERN1’s Large Hadron Collider set a new world record for beam intensity at a hadron collider when it collided beams with a luminosity of 4.67 × 1032cm-2s-1. This exceeds the previous world record of 4.024 × 1032cm-2s-1, which was set by the US Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory’s Tevatron collider in 2010, and marks an important milestone in LHC commissioning.

CERN announces LHC to run in 2012

Geneva, 31 January 2011. CERN1 today announced that the LHC will run through to the end of 2012 with a short technical stop at the end of 2011. The beam energy for 2011 will be 3.5 TeV. This decision, taken by CERN management following the annual planning workshop held in Chamonix last week and a report delivered today by the laboratory’s machine advisory committee, gives the LHC’s experiments a good chance of finding new physics in the next two years, before the LHC goes into a long shutdown to prepare for higher energy running starting 2014.

CERN Council welcomes new candidates for Membership

Geneva, 17 December 2010. Delegates attending the 157th session of the CERN Council today congratulated the laboratory on the LHC’s successful first year of running, and looked forward to a bright future for basic science at CERN1. Top of the agenda was the opening of CERN to new members. Formal discussions can begin now with Cyprus, Israel, Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey for accession to Membership, while Brazil’s candidature for Associate Membership was also warmly received.

CERN experiment makes progress towards antihydrogen beams

Geneva, 6 December 2010. The ASACUSA1 experiment at CERN2 has taken an important step forward in developing an innovative technique for studying antimatter. Using a novel particle trap, called a CUSP trap, the experiment has succeeded in producing significant numbers of antihydrogen atoms in flight. This result is published today in the journal Physical Review Letters.

LHC experiments bring new insight into primordial universe

Geneva, 26 November 2010. After less than three weeks of heavy-ion running, the three experiments studying lead ion collisions at the LHC have already brought new insight into matter as it would have existed in the very first instants of the Universe’s life. The ALICE experiment, which is optimised for the study of heavy ions, published two papers just a few days after the start of lead-ion running. Now, the first direct observation of a phenomenon known as jet quenching has been made by both the ATLAS and CMS collaborations.

Antimatter atoms produced and trapped at CERN

Geneva, 17 November 2010. The ALPHA experiment at CERN1 has taken an important step forward in developing techniques to understand one of the Universe’s open questions: is there a difference between matter and antimatter? In a paper published in Nature today, the collaboration shows that it has successfully produced and trapped atoms of antihydrogen. This development opens the path to new ways of making detailed measurements of antihydrogen, which will in turn allow scientists to compare matter and antimatter.

CERN completes transition to lead-ion running at the LHC

Geneva, 8 November 2010. Four days is all it took for the LHC operations team at CERN1 to complete the transition from protons to lead ions in the LHC. After extracting the final proton beam of 2010 on 4 November, commissioning the lead-ion beam was underway by early afternoon. First collisions were recorded at 00:30 CET on 7 November, and stable running conditions marked the start of physics with heavy ions at 11:20 CET today.

The LHC enters a new phase

Geneva, 4 November 2010.  Proton running for 2010 in the LHC at CERN1 came to a successful conclusion today at 08:00 CET. Since the end of March, when the first collisions occurred at a total energy of 7 TeV, the machine and experiment teams have achieved all of their objectives for the first year of proton physics at this record energy and new ground has been explored. For the rest of the year the LHC is moving to a different phase of operation, in which lead ions will be accelerated and brought into collision in the machine for the first time.

The ATLAS collaboration at CERN unveils giant mural

Geneva, 6 October 2010. The ATLAS1 collaboration at CERN2 today officially unveiled a giant mural depicting the ATLAS particle detector, which is currently collecting data at the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider. Installed in a cavern 100 metres underground, the ATLAS detector is no longer open for visits. The mural, painted on the wall of an ATLAS surface building by American artist Josef Kristofoletti, is three storeys tall yet still one-third the size of the actual detector.

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