Latest press releases

CERN Council welcomes new candidates for Membership

Geneva, 17 December 2010. Delegates attending the 157th session of the CERN Council today congratulated the laboratory on the LHC’s successful first year of running, and looked forward to a bright future for basic science at CERN1. Top of the agenda was the opening of CERN to new members. Formal discussions can begin now with Cyprus, Israel, Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey for accession to Membership, while Brazil’s candidature for Associate Membership was also warmly received.

CERN experiment makes progress towards antihydrogen beams

Geneva, 6 December 2010. The ASACUSA1 experiment at CERN2 has taken an important step forward in developing an innovative technique for studying antimatter. Using a novel particle trap, called a CUSP trap, the experiment has succeeded in producing significant numbers of antihydrogen atoms in flight. This result is published today in the journal Physical Review Letters.

LHC experiments bring new insight into primordial universe

Geneva, 26 November 2010. After less than three weeks of heavy-ion running, the three experiments studying lead ion collisions at the LHC have already brought new insight into matter as it would have existed in the very first instants of the Universe’s life. The ALICE experiment, which is optimised for the study of heavy ions, published two papers just a few days after the start of lead-ion running. Now, the first direct observation of a phenomenon known as jet quenching has been made by both the ATLAS and CMS collaborations.

Antimatter atoms produced and trapped at CERN

Geneva, 17 November 2010. The ALPHA experiment at CERN1 has taken an important step forward in developing techniques to understand one of the Universe’s open questions: is there a difference between matter and antimatter? In a paper published in Nature today, the collaboration shows that it has successfully produced and trapped atoms of antihydrogen. This development opens the path to new ways of making detailed measurements of antihydrogen, which will in turn allow scientists to compare matter and antimatter.

CERN completes transition to lead-ion running at the LHC

Geneva, 8 November 2010. Four days is all it took for the LHC operations team at CERN1 to complete the transition from protons to lead ions in the LHC. After extracting the final proton beam of 2010 on 4 November, commissioning the lead-ion beam was underway by early afternoon. First collisions were recorded at 00:30 CET on 7 November, and stable running conditions marked the start of physics with heavy ions at 11:20 CET today.

The LHC enters a new phase

Geneva, 4 November 2010.  Proton running for 2010 in the LHC at CERN1 came to a successful conclusion today at 08:00 CET. Since the end of March, when the first collisions occurred at a total energy of 7 TeV, the machine and experiment teams have achieved all of their objectives for the first year of proton physics at this record energy and new ground has been explored. For the rest of the year the LHC is moving to a different phase of operation, in which lead ions will be accelerated and brought into collision in the machine for the first time.

The ATLAS collaboration at CERN unveils giant mural

Geneva, 6 October 2010. The ATLAS1 collaboration at CERN2 today officially unveiled a giant mural depicting the ATLAS particle detector, which is currently collecting data at the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider. Installed in a cavern 100 metres underground, the ATLAS detector is no longer open for visits. The mural, painted on the wall of an ATLAS surface building by American artist Josef Kristofoletti, is three storeys tall yet still one-third the size of the actual detector.

Be a researcher for an evening on European researchers’ night, Friday 24 September

Geneva, 16 September 2010. On Friday 24 September, CERN1 will be one of 260 European locations involved in the 5th edition of the European Researchers’ Night, an initiative funded by the European Union’s Science and Society programme aimed at highlighting the appeal of being a researcher and promoting scientific research among young Europeans.

AMS experiment takes off for Kennedy Space Center

Geneva, 18 August 2010. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), an experiment that will search for antimatter and dark matter in space, leaves CERN1 next Tuesday on the next leg of its journey to the International Space Station. The AMS detector2 is being transported from CERN to Geneva International Airport in preparation for its planned departure from Switzerland on 26 August, when it will be flown to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on board a US Air Force Galaxy transport aircraft.

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