Latest press releases

Two circulating beams bring first collisions in the LHC

Geneva, 23 November 2009. Today the LHC circulated two beams simultaneously for the first time, allowing the operators to test the synchronization of the beams and giving the experiments their first chance to look for proton-proton collisions. With just one bunch of particles circulating in each direction, the beams can be made to cross in up to two places in the ring. From early in the afternoon, the beams were made to cross at points 1 and 5, home to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, both of which were on the look out for collisions. Later, beams crossed at points 2 and 8, ALICE and LHCb.

The LHC is back

Geneva, 20 November 2009. Particle beams are once again circulating in the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, CERN1’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This news comes after the machine was handed over for operation on Wednesday morning. A clockwise circulating beam was established at ten o'clock this evening. This is an important milestone on the road towards first physics at the LHC, expected in 2010.

"Voyage to the Heart of Matter" in pop-up form

Geneva, 19 October 2009. Voyage to the Heart of Matter, a new pop-up book about the science of CERN1's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), focusing on the ATLAS experiment, will be published on 9 November in London. Other language editions will follow. Journalists are invited to the press launch of the UK edition at 10am on 9 November at the Royal Institution2 Time & Space Café, where they will be able to pick up a review copy. There will also be interview opportunities with physicists at this exciting time just before first physics at the LHC.

LHC to run at 3.5 TeV for early part of 2009-2010 run rising later

Geneva, 6 August 2009. CERN's1 Large Hadron Collider will initially run at an energy of 3.5 TeV per beam when it starts up in November this year. This news comes after all tests on the machine's high-current electrical connections were completed last week, indicating that no further repairs are necessary for safe running.

"We've selected 3.5 TeV to start," said CERN's Director General, Rolf Heuer, "because it allows the LHC operators to gain experience of running the machine safely while opening up a new discovery region for the experiments."

CERN and EU Commission agree on closer scientific partnership

Geneva, 17 July 2009. Today in Brussels, CERN1 and the European Commission are to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU), which aims to enhance the long-standing partnership between the two organizations. The MoU will provide a structured framework for cooperation across a broad range of issues of common interest, with emphasis on consolidating and further developing the European Research Area and facilitating the implementation of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, as defined by the CERN Council.

Grids Step-up to a Set of New Records: Scale Testing for the Experiment Programme '09 (STEP'09)

Geneva, 1 July 2009. Preparations are under way for the restart of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the world's most powerful particle accelerator. One of the most important systems needed to support the experiments that will utilise this great machine is the global computing grid: the worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). After months of preparation and two intensive weeks of 24 x 7 operation the LHC experiments are celebrating the achievement of a new set of goals aimed at demonstrating full readiness for the LHC data taking run expected to start later this year.

CERN awarded environmental label

Geneva, 25 June 2009. On 9 June, CERN1 was awarded the "Nature & Economie" label by the Swiss Foundation of the same name, in recognition of its land management on the Meyrin site. The label is awarded to organisations that contribute to biological diversity, and at least 30% of the green areas around buildings have to be managed naturally.

CERN reports on progress towards LHC restart

Geneva, 19 June 2009. At the 151st session of the CERN1 Council today, CERN Director General Rolf Heuer confirmed that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) remains on schedule for a restart this autumn, albeit about 2-3 weeks later than originally foreseen. Following the incident of 19 September 2008 that brought the LHC to a standstill, a great deal of work has been done to understand the causes of the incident and ensure that a similar incident cannot happen again.

University of Geneva honours LHC project leader at 450th anniversary ceremony

Geneva, 5 June 2009. The University of Geneva is today holding a ceremony at which honorary degrees will be bestowed on four figures renowned for their activities in bringing nations together, including international collaboration in scientific research at CERN1.

The ceremony is to celebrate the university’s 450th anniversary2. The honorary degrees, which recognize endeavours in human rights and in fostering dialogue between nations, are being awarded to Mary Robinson3, Desmond Tutu4, Pascal Lamy5 and Lyn Evans.

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