Latest press releases

Two circulating beams bring first collisions in the LHC

Geneva, 23 November 2009. Today the LHC circulated two beams simultaneously for the first time, allowing the operators to test the synchronization of the beams and giving the experiments their first chance to look for proton-proton collisions. With just one bunch of particles circulating in each direction, the beams can be made to cross in up to two places in the ring. From early in the afternoon, the beams were made to cross at points 1 and 5, home to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, both of which were on the look out for collisions. Later, beams crossed at points 2 and 8, ALICE and LHCb.

The LHC is back

Geneva, 20 November 2009. Particle beams are once again circulating in the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, CERN1’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This news comes after the machine was handed over for operation on Wednesday morning. A clockwise circulating beam was established at ten o'clock this evening. This is an important milestone on the road towards first physics at the LHC, expected in 2010.

"Voyage to the Heart of Matter" in pop-up form

Geneva, 19 October 2009. Voyage to the Heart of Matter, a new pop-up book about the science of CERN1's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), focusing on the ATLAS experiment, will be published on 9 November in London. Other language editions will follow. Journalists are invited to the press launch of the UK edition at 10am on 9 November at the Royal Institution2 Time & Space Café, where they will be able to pick up a review copy. There will also be interview opportunities with physicists at this exciting time just before first physics at the LHC.

LHC to run at 3.5 TeV for early part of 2009-2010 run rising later

Geneva, 6 August 2009. CERN's1 Large Hadron Collider will initially run at an energy of 3.5 TeV per beam when it starts up in November this year. This news comes after all tests on the machine's high-current electrical connections were completed last week, indicating that no further repairs are necessary for safe running.

"We've selected 3.5 TeV to start," said CERN's Director General, Rolf Heuer, "because it allows the LHC operators to gain experience of running the machine safely while opening up a new discovery region for the experiments."

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